Episodes

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S2 EP12
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  • Prosecutors Think They Can Extract Data from Phones Seized During Inauguration Day Protests
    By Nick Statt 03/22/2017
    Court papers filed today indicate that prosecutors are trying to break into locked smartphones seized during arrests made on Inauguration Day. According to a report from BuzzFeed, there are more than 100 phones involved, some belonging to individuals who have not been indicted. These devices were seized by law enforcement on January 20th when 214 people were arrested on felony rioting charges related to demonstrations held in protest of President Donald Trump.
    Court papers filed today indicate that prosecutors are trying to break into locked smartphones seized during arrests made on Inauguration Day. According to a report from BuzzFeed, there are more than 100 phones involved, some belonging to individuals who have not been indicted. These devices were seized by law enforcement on January 20th when 214 people were arrested on felony rioting charges related to demonstrations held in protest of President Donald Trump.
  • LastPass Security Flaw Could Have Let Hackers Steal Passwords Through Browser Extensions
    By Colin Lecher 03/22/2017
    A LastPass security vulnerability could have allowed malicious attackers to steal users’ passwords, a researcher revealed this week.
    A LastPass security vulnerability could have allowed malicious attackers to steal users’ passwords, a researcher revealed this week.
  • Is Android Security Turning a Corner?
    By Russell Brandom 03/22/2017
    Android security has always been an uphill fight. Unlike iOS, there’s no single mandatory App Store, making it easier for a bad link to give rise to a persistent malware problem. At the same time, the operating system is spread across dozens of carriers and device manufacturers, making it hard to push out fixes once a vulnerability is discovered. But after 2015’s Stagefright bug, Google started a new crackdown, hardening subsequent versions of Android and demanding better patching schedules from partners. Now, a year and a half later, those efforts may finally be starting to bear fruit.
    Android security has always been an uphill fight. Unlike iOS, there’s no single mandatory App Store, making it easier for a bad link to give rise to a persistent malware problem. At the same time, the operating system is spread across dozens of carriers and device manufacturers, making it hard to push out fixes once a vulnerability is discovered. But after 2015’s Stagefright bug, Google started a new crackdown, hardening subsequent versions of Android and demanding better patching schedules from partners. Now, a year and a half later, those efforts may finally be starting to bear fruit.
  • iCloud May Have Doxxed a Journalist’s Twitter Attacker
    By Russell Brandom 03/20/2017
    In theory, it was the perfect setup: an anonymous Twitter account on a prepaid SIM card, bought with cash. With no credit card or other identifiable info tied to the account, there should have been no way to trace tweets back to a human.
    In theory, it was the perfect setup: an anonymous Twitter account on a prepaid SIM card, bought with cash. With no credit card or other identifiable info tied to the account, there should have been no way to trace tweets back to a human.