Featured From The Verge

Featured From The Verge
Posted on 04/14/2017
Featured From The Verge
Airbnb today announced a new set of mandatory security measures, including multi-factor authentication, it’s implementing to prevent account takeovers. Now, for the first time, Airbnb will require both hosts and guests logging in from new devices to verify their identity with a second account, either via SMS or email. A vast majority of other social and communication apps use multi-factor authentication, including Facebook, Google, and Twitter, making Airbnb a bit of an outlier to have gone so long before enabling it by default.
Posted on 04/14/2017
Featured From The Verge
This morning, a new set of hacking tools was released by TheShadowBrokers group, revealing new techniques for hacking both Windows and certain financial networks.
Posted on 04/14/2017
Featured From The Verge
Facebook is increasing its efforts to cut down on spam and improve security. Today, the company announced that it has put an end to a spam operation that generated thousands of fake Likes on publisher’s pages. Facebook says it’s been fighting the operation for six months as part of a wider crackdown on fake accounts.
Posted on 04/09/2017
Featured From The Verge
Emergency sirens around Dallas Texas activated late on Friday night, waking residents across the city for over an hour, prompting a flood of calls to the city’s 911 center. Officials from the city’s emergency management office have confirmed that there was no emergency, and that the system was breached by hackers.
Posted on 04/05/2017
Featured From The Verge
A recently discovered vulnerability in a Wi-Fi chipset could be exploited to take over devices without users’ knowledge. A Google researcher publicly disclosed the bug in a blog post this week, which accompanied news from both Apple and Google that they’re patching devices in response. In his post and as detailed by Ars Technica, Gal Beniamini demonstrates how he exploited a Wi-Fi SoC manufactured by Broadcom to execute malicious code by solely being within the same Wi-Fi range of the targeted phone. No user interaction is required.
Posted on 03/28/2017
Featured From The Verge
When the Turkish Crime Family first broke into the news last week, they sounded like a crisis in the making. The group claimed to have stolen a massive trove of iCloud credentials — the first over 300 million, then as many as 559 million — and unless they got $75,000 from the company before April 7, they would start remotely wiping phones. Apple responded with a limited denial, stating that company servers hadn’t been breached, but allowing for the possibility that the credentials had been obtained some other way.
Posted on 03/27/2017
Featured From The Verge
The UK government wants to compromise WhatsApp’s encryption. It’s a familiar demand that we’ve seen before in the US and in the UK, but despite the technical ignorance of politicians and the myths used to push this policy, we need to take the debate seriously. Again.
Posted on 03/27/2017
Featured From The Verge
Following last week’s terrorist attack in London, the UK government has renewed a familiar campaign against digital encryption. Echoing criticisms made in 2015 by then prime minister David Cameron after the Charlie Hebdo attacks in Paris, UK home secretary Amber Rudd this weekend described the government’s inability to read messages on end-to-end encrypted messaging apps as “completely unacceptable.
Posted on 03/23/2017
Featured From The Verge
For years, the CIA has been developing tools for hacking into Apple products — and thanks to WikiLeaks, those tools are now public. Today, the group published a new set of documents dubbed “Dark Matter,” part of the ongoing Vault 7 publication on CIA hacking tools. Today’s documents focus specifically on Apple products, detailing the CIA’s methods for breaking into MacBooks and iPhones.
Posted on 03/23/2017
Featured From The Verge
New research from the security firm ZeroFox shows a surge in Bitcoin-related crimes during the first three weeks of March, just as the cryptocurrency was moving to integrate into conventional financial markets. The scams varied from straightforward phishing attempts to more elaborate pyramid schemes — but in each case, the familiar Bitcoin logo was front and center, employed as a way to gain the target’s trust. Over a three-week period, ZeroFox tracked 3,618 unique URLs linked to those scams, shared over 8,742 social media posts, although it’s unclear how many criminal groups were responsible.